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January 2024

The Achilles tendon, the body's largest and strongest tendon, is susceptible to injury due to its limited blood supply and exposure to various forces. Aging and increased activity, particularly in high-velocity sports, raise the risk of Achilles tendon injuries. As the aging population remains active, these conditions are becoming more common, yet they are missed in approximately one-fourth of cases. Injuries can happen suddenly or develop gradually, often leading to extended healing processes. To make an accurate diagnosis and establish an effective treatment plan, a comprehensive medical history and specific physical examination are critical. The primary approach to managing tendonitis, peritendonitis, tendinosis, and retrocalcaneobursitis involves rest, cold therapy, anti-inflammatory medications, and orthotics. Tendon ruptures require casting or surgical intervention. Adequate treatment typically results in a complete recovery. If you have a painful Achilles tendon, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for a proper evaluation and treatment options.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact the podiatrists of The Foot & Ankle Center of New Jersey. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Paramus, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What are Achilles Tendon Injuries
Published in Blog
Tuesday, 30 January 2024 00:00

What are Achilles Tendon Injuries

The Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the human body. Its purpose is to connect the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. This tendon is responsible for facilitating all types of movement, like walking and running. This tendon provides an enormous amount of mobility for the body. Any injuries inflicted to this tissue should be immediately brought up with a physician to prevent further damage. 

The most common injuries that can trouble the Achilles tendon are tendon ruptures and Achilles tendinitis. Achilles tendinitis is the milder of the two injuries. It can be recognized by the following symptoms: inflammation, dull-to-severe pain, increased blood flow to the tendon, thickening of the tendon, and slower movement time. Tendinitis can be treated via several methods and is often diagnosed by an MRI. 

An Achilles tendon rupture is trickier to heal, and is by far the most painful injury. It is caused by the tendon ripping or completely snapping. The results are immediate and absolutely devastating, and will render the patient immobile. If a rupture or tear occurs, operative and non-operative methods are available. Once the treatment begins, depending on the severity of the injury, recovery time for these types of issues can take up to a year. 

Simple preventative measures can be taken as a means to avoid both injuries. Prior to any movement, taking a few minutes to stretch out the tendon is a great way to stimulate the tissue. Calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses are all suggested ways to help strengthen the lower legs and promote Achilles tendon health. 

Many problems arise among athletes and people who overexert themselves while exercising. Problems can also happen among those who do not warm up properly before beginning an activity. Proper, comfortable shoes that fit correctly can also decrease tendon injuries. Some professionals also suggest that when exercising, you should make sure that the floor you are on is cushioned or has a mat. This will relieve pressure on the heels. A healthy diet will also increase tendon health. 

It is very important to seek out a podiatrist if you believe you have an injury in the Achilles region. Further damage could result in severe complications that would make being mobile difficult, if not impossible.

Published in Featured
Tuesday, 23 January 2024 00:00

Foot Pain

The feet, being the foundation of the body, carry all of the body’s weight and are therefore prone to experiencing pain and discomfort. If you are experiencing foot pain, it is important to determine where in the foot you are experiencing this pain to help discover the cause of it. While pain can be experienced virtually anywhere in the foot, the most common sites of foot pain are in the heel and ankle.   

Heel pain can be due to a multitude of conditions including plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and heel spurs. Pain experienced in the ankle can be a sign of an ankle sprain, arthritis, gout, ankle instability, ankle fracture, or nerve compression. In more serious cases, pain in the foot can be a sign of improper alignment or an infection.

Foot pain can be accompanied by symptoms including redness, swelling, stiffness and warmth in the affected area. Whether the pain can be described as sharp or dull depends on the foot condition behind it. It is important to visit your local podiatrist if your foot pain and its accompanying symptoms persist and do not improve over time.

Depending on the location and condition of your foot pain, your podiatrist may prescribe certain treatments. These treatments can include but are not limited to prescription or over-the-counter drugs and medications, certain therapies, cortisone injections, or surgery.

If you are experiencing persistent foot pain, it is important to consult with your foot and ankle doctor to determine the cause and location. He or she will then prescribe the best treatment for you. While milder cases of foot pain may respond well to rest and at-home treatments, more serious cases may take some time to fully recover.

Published in Featured
Tuesday, 23 January 2024 00:00

Foot Pain Management

Foot pain is a common symptom associated with various foot conditions, and there are several options available for pain relief. When dealing with foot pain, it is advisable to explore conservative, non-pharmaceutical methods first. If your foot feels warm to the touch, indicating inflammation, using cold treatment can help reduce swelling. Conversely, if your feet are tired but not inflamed, a warm foot soak can provide relaxation. Foot massage is another effective practice that can improve circulation, reduce tension, and alleviate pain, and it can easily be done on your own or with the help of massage devices such as foot rollers. When it comes to pharmaceutical treatment, there are various options to consider. Included among them are oral analgesics, topical analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, nerve-related medication, nerve blocks, and corticosteroids. If you have persistent foot pain, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment that will be tailored to your specific case.

Foot Pain

Foot pain can be extremely painful and debilitating. If you have a foot pain, consult with the podiatrists from The Foot & Ankle Center of New Jersey. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Causes

Foot pain is a very broad condition that could be caused by one or more ailments. The most common include:

  • Bunions
  • Hammertoes
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Bone Spurs
  • Corns
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Ingrown Toenails
  • Arthritis (such as Gout, Rheumatoid, and Osteoarthritis)
  • Flat Feet
  • Injury (from stress fractures, broken toe, foot, ankle, Achilles tendon ruptures, and sprains)
  • And more

Diagnosis

To figure out the cause of foot pain, podiatrists utilize several different methods. This can range from simple visual inspections and sensation tests to X-rays and MRI scans. Prior medical history, family medical history, and any recent physical traumatic events will all be taken into consideration for a proper diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatment depends upon the cause of the foot pain. Whether it is resting, staying off the foot, or having surgery; podiatrists have a number of treatment options available for foot pain.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Paramus, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Foot Pain
Published in Blog
Tuesday, 16 January 2024 00:00

Bunions

A bunion is an enlargement of the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot, often formed from a bony growth or a patch of swollen tissues. It is caused by the inward shifting of the bones in the big toe, toward the other toes of the foot. This shift can cause a serious amount of pain and discomfort. The area around the big toe can become inflamed, red, and painful.

Bunions are most commonly formed in people who are already genetically predisposed to them or other kinds of bone displacements. Existing bunions can be worsened by wearing improperly fitting shoes. Trying to cram your feet into high heels or running or walking in a way that causes too much stress on the feet can exacerbate bunion development. High heels not only push the big toe inward, but shift one's body weight and center of gravity towards the edge of the feet and toes, expediting bone displacement.

A podiatrist knowledgeable in foot structure and biomechanics will be able to quickly diagnose bunions. Bunions must be distinguished from gout or arthritic conditions, so blood tests may be necessary. The podiatrist may order a radiological exam to provide an image of the bone structure. If the x-ray demonstrates an enlargement of the joint near the base of the toe and a shifting toward the smaller toes, this is indicative of a bunion.

Wearing wider shoes can reduce pressure on the bunion and minimize pain, and high heeled shoes should be eliminated for a period of time. This may be enough to eliminate the pain associated with bunions; however, if pain persists, anti-inflammatory drugs may be prescribed. Severe pain may require an injection of steroids near the bunion. Orthotics for shoes may be prescribed which, by altering the pressure on the foot, can be helpful in reducing pain. These do not correct the problem; but by eliminating the pain, they can provide relief.

For cases that do not respond to these methods of treatment, surgery can be done to reposition the toe. A surgeon may do this by taking out a section of bone or by rearranging the ligaments and tendons in the toe to help keep it properly aligned. It may be necessary even after surgery to wear more comfortable shoes that avoid placing pressure on the toe, as the big toe may move back to its former orientation toward the smaller toes.

Published in Featured
Tuesday, 16 January 2024 00:00

Bunions on the Outside of the Foot

Tailor's bunions, also known as bunionettes, present a unique challenge with a bony lump on the outside of the foot around the small toe joint. While tight and ill-fitting shoes can exacerbate the issue, the exact cause of bunionettes is not fully understood. Inherited factors and the natural shape of foot bones play a significant role in bunionette formation. Causes include previous toe joint injuries, joint hypermobility, age, inflammatory arthritic conditions, tight leg muscles, and neuromuscular conditions. Footwear can also play a significant role. Tailor's bunions can cause discomfort and pain by putting pressure on the joint, bursa, and surrounding nerves. Treatment can include rest and elevation, applying a cold compress, and choosing footwear with cushioned heels, and good arch support. Further, using insoles, engaging in regular stretching and foot exercises, and exploring activities that put minimal pressure on the feet, such as swimming, may help. Weight management may also be beneficial.  Footwear to avoid include wearing high heels and tight shoes, in addition to prolonged standing and walking barefoot on hard surfaces. If you have a bunionette that is causing discomfort, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for an exam and treatment options.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact the podiatrists of The Foot & Ankle Center of New Jersey. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Paramus, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions
Published in Blog
Tuesday, 09 January 2024 00:00

What Is a Seed Corn?

Corns are patches of thickened skin that develop on your feet, which can result from repetitive activities, wearing poorly fitting shoes, or underlying foot conditions. Among the different corn varieties, seed corns, also known as heloma miliare, can pose a unique challenge due to their small size, hardness, and often inconspicuous appearance on the soles of the feet. Seed corns are tiny, well-defined circular spots of hardened skin, commonly found in multiples on the sole where they create a distinctive pattern. Even though seed corns are often asymptomatic, they may cause discomfort or pain when pressure is applied, particularly in weight-bearing areas of the feet. Distinguishing seed corns from calluses is important for proper diagnosis and treatment. Unlike calluses, which are typically larger and can vary in shape, seed corns maintain a consistent round appearance. Additionally, calluses are more prone to form around the heel or the ball of the foot, while seed corns tend to cluster on the sole. For that reason, seed corns also can be mistaken for plantar warts. If you suspect you have a seed corn, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment. 

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact the podiatrists of The Foot & Ankle Center of New Jersey. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Paramus, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Corns and Calluses
Published in Blog
Tuesday, 09 January 2024 00:00

Corns and Calluses

A corn is a lesion that forms in the skin of the foot, and it is typically circular in shape, small in size, and thick and rough in texture.  A corn generally occurs as a result of repeated pressure on the skin; one example of this is the rubbing of a shoe against the skin.  Corns differ from calluses in that their central cores are harder in texture.

A corn is a relatively common condition with a wide variety of treatment options.  If a corn becomes overly uncomfortable or painful, consult with your podiatrist; he can determine the best method of treatment that is appropriate for you.  Corns may return if the underlying cause of its development is not treated or removed.  Avoid removing corns at home, as improper removal may cause infection.

A callus, similar to a corn, is an area of skin that has become thickened due to repeated pressure and rubbing.  The rubbing causes the skin to create a layer of protective skin, which is the formed callus.  Calluses can differ in size between people, and they can also become painful.

Multiple treatments are available for calluses.  At-home treatment and removal should be avoided, as this can potentially lead to infection.  Your podiatrist can best determine the cause of your calluses and suggest the treatment most appropriate for you. 

Published in Featured
Wednesday, 03 January 2024 00:00

Plantar Warts Can Be Treated!

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Published in Blog

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is often caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is usually the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries. Plaque buildup, or atherosclerosis, can be the result of excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This restricts how much blood can flow through arteries. Reduced blood flow to a certain area of the body severely limits the amount of oxygen and nutrients that part of the body receives. This leads to degeneration in the muscles and other tissues. Sometimes, poor blood circulation in the feet and legs can be caused by other conditions, such as the damaging or inflammation of blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

The lack of oxygen and nutrients caused by poor blood circulation can restrict muscle growth and development, as well as cause muscle pain and cramps, weakness, and stiffness. Other common symptoms include numbness in the legs and feet, skin discoloration in the affected limbs, slower nail and hair growth, and erectile dysfunction in men. In more severe cases of PAD, pain can be present even when a person isn't exercising, and may range from mildly uncomfortable to completely debilitating.

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is more common in those who are overweight or obese, have diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, who smoke, or who have a family history of PAD or related conditions such as a heart attack, stroke, etc. Diabetes and smoking place a person at greatest risk for developing poor blood circulation, although advanced age, over 50, can also increase risk.

If you are experiencing poor blood circulation in the feet and legs caused by PAD, it is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce your risk of experiencing a heart attack or stroke caused by this condition. If you smoke, quit completely. This will increase the amount of oxygen in your bloodstream. Exercising and reducing the saturated fats in your diet. Saturated fats come from fatty meats, fried foods, whole milk, etc., can make a difference in improving blood circulation in feet. It is also important to avoid developing influenza and to carefully control your blood sugar if you have diabetes.

Your doctor may recommend combining lifestyle changes with a prescription medication regimen to improve blood circulation. The most commonly-used medications for PAD are called statins and work by blocking the amount of enzymes in your body that produce cholesterol. They are known by the brand names Zocor, Lipitor, Crestor, and others.

Published in Featured
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